By Habitat

Backyard Habitat

Backyard Habitat

To attract wildlife to your backyard, you need to provide habitat that gives food, water, and shelter. Different wildlife species require different plant species and structure. Using native plants is recommended, when possible.

Backyard Forests

Backyard Forests

Even small woodlots in your backyard are important for wildlife habitat. Management recommendations can be applied to attract and maintain wildlife and/or produce secondary forest products.

Bottomland Hardwoods

Bottomland Hardwoods

Many wildlife species eat the berries, flowers, and mast produced in bottomland hardwoods. This is valuable habitat for a variety of wildlife including some aquatic species.

Field Borders

Field Borders

Field borders are trees, grasses or shrubs placed in around agricultural fields that provide food and habitat to many animal species including bobwhite quail. They also protect the field from erosion and human elements such as the runoff of herbicides. 

Native Warm-Season Grasses

Native Grasses

Warm-season grasses include annual and perennial grasses native to area. These grasses provide habitat and food for wildlife species as well as forages for livestock and reduce erosion and agricultural runoff.

Pine Forests and Stands

Pine Forests

Thinning, prescribed burning, disking, the use of herbicides, and other techniques may be used to increase or improve wildlife habitat in managed stands. Creating and maintaining habitat for different types of wildlife requires planning and management.

Farm Ponds

Ponds

Farm ponds can provide good recreational fishing when planned and managed well. Considerations include the location of the pond, selecting fish species and stocking the pond, the water quality, food for the fish, and how developed or natural the land should be kept.

Wetlands

Wetlands

Wetlands occur when land-based and water-based ecosystems join. They are important for many reasons including providing habitats and food for numerous plant and animal species. Recently a dramatic loss of wetlands has occurred because of natural changes and human activity.